Coronary Care Unit

banner_centro_cardiovascular

Coronary Care Unit

Hospital unit in which patients with acute cardiac problems receive intensive care by critical care cardiologists and multidisciplinary teams specialized in cardiology.

Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO)
In extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO), blood is pumped out of the body to a heart-lung machine that removes carbon dioxide and returns oxygen-rich blood to the body’s tissues. Blood flows from the right side of the heart to the membrane oxygenator in the heart-lung machine. It is then reheated and sent back to the body. This method allows blood to “bypass” the heart and lungs, allowing these organs to rest and heal. It is used in intensive care situations when your heart or lungs need help so you can heal. It can be used in the medical care of COVID-19, acute respiratory distress syndrome, and other infections.

pain2

Lifestyle changes to prevent an acute myocardial infarction.

A healthy lifestyle plays an important role in reducing the risk of death and heart attack.

You can do a lot to improve the health of your heart and your blood circulation, even if you have had an acute myocardial infarction.

Here are some recommendations to have a healthy life and reduce the risk of having a heart attack:

  • Do not smoke. 
  • Improve your eating habits. 
  • Eat foods low in saturated fat, cholesterol, and sodium. 
  • Performs physical activity under medical supervision. 
  • Take your medications at the dosage and times indicated by the doctor.
  • Take your blood pressure frequently. 
  • Maintain a healthy weight. 
  • Lower your stress levels. 
  • Seek emotional support when needed
  • Visit your doctor regularly.
Cardiometabolic Check up

Cardiometabolic Check up

We put at your disposal the Cardiometabolic Check-up to detect and treat risk factors (such as obesity, overweight, glucose intolerance, diabetes, hypercholesterolemia, sedentary lifestyle, smoking, etc.).

Nutrition recommendations for the patient with cardiovascular diseases

The global prevalence of chronic non-communicable diseases (cardiovascular diseases, diabetes, high blood pressure, obesity) has risen dramatically in recent decades. In Mexico, this increase is linked to the epidemiological transition, which generates a double public health problem. On the one hand, there is a lag in the control of communicable diseases and malnutrition, and on the other hand, there has been an exponential increase in chronic non-communicable diseases in the last 30 years.

For the most part, cardiovascular diseases are chronic in nature and usually manifest during adult life.

For both preventive and therapeutic recommendations, the health team must consider the evaluation of lifestyle, in particular, eating habits and physical activity of each individual, in order to promote viable measures in each case.

Nutritional composition of the diet

Energy

Enough to get hold
a healthy weight

Carbohydrates

50 – 60% of  TEV

Protein

About 15% of  TEV

Fiber

20-30 g/day

Total lipids

Total lipids

Cholesterol

<200 mg/day

Saturated fatty acids

<7% of  TEV

Polyunsaturated fatty acids

Up to 10% of TEV

Monounsaturated fatty acids

Up to 20% of  TEV

TEV: Total energy value
Adapted from: Nutritional Institutes of Health

Recommendations for psychological intervention for patients with cardiovascular disease

Cardiovascular disease has physical and emotional consequences and affects the different areas of the quality of life of the person who suffers from it. Trying to face the different challenges that the disease implies can feel like a burden and generate different emotional states. It has been observed that it is common, after being diagnosed, to show symptoms of depression, anxiety, stress, fear, and catastrophic thoughts. The care and management of these emotional states after a cardiovascular event is important as they play a role in the prognosis and optimal recovery from the disease.

Cardiovascular disease has physical and emotional consequences and affects the different areas of the quality of life of the person who suffers from it. Trying to face the different challenges that the disease implies can feel like a burden and generate different emotional states.

It has been observed that it is common, after being diagnosed, to show symptoms of depression, anxiety, stress, fear, and catastrophic thoughts. The care and management of these emotional states after a cardiovascular event is important as they play a role in the prognosis and optimal recovery from the disease.

cardio-recomendaciones-banner

If you have any of the following symptoms, it is advisable to seek support from a mental health specialist:

  • Feeling sad or depressed most of the day or almost every day.
  • Show less interest or inability to enjoy what you used to enjoy.
  • You have noticed an increase or decrease in appetite.
  • You have had insomnia or hypersomnia.
  • You have felt sluggish or lethargic.
  • You have felt loss of energy.
  • You have difficulty concentrating, thinking, making decisions, or forgetfulness.
  • You have negative and catastrophic thoughts.
  • You feel nervous or anxious almost every day or most of the day.
  • You are irritable.
  • You have muscle tension.

Sometimes interpersonal relationships are affected by the emotions derived from facing the disease and the new lifestyle. Therefore, you could present some behaviors at an interpersonal level such as

  • Irritability. 
  • Anger. 
  • Low tolerance. 
  • Excessive demand for attention. 
  • Emotional withdrawal. 
  • Apprehension. 
  • Lack of communication. 
  • Excessive worries.

If you detect these behaviors and feelings, it is possible to modify them with the help of a professional. Remember that your illness also affects those around you.

Our
Locations

At ABC Medical Center, we are prepared to serve you in out two Campuses 24/24h, 7 days a week.

Campus Observatorio

Sur 136 No. 116, Col. Las Américas,
Álvaro Obregón, 01120, Cd. de México.

Tel. 55 5230 8000

Campus Santa Fe

Av. Carlos Graef Fernández 154, Col. Santa Fe,
Cuajimalpa, 05300, Cd. de México.

Tel. 55 1103 1600